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Is it ever wise to admit fault after a car accident?

On Behalf of | Feb 14, 2022 | Motor Vehicle Accidents |

At one time or another, all drivers have thought they probably did something wrong behind the wheel. If you are speeding, tailgating or otherwise driving irresponsibly, giving a contrite wave may help prevent road rage. Regrettably, though, your poor driving also may cause or contribute to an accident.

If you know you are in the wrong, it may be tempting to accept fault for the car accident. You probably want to resist this urge, though, as admitting blame may lead to serious consequences for you. Furthermore, you simply may be incorrect in thinking you are at fault.

You cannot know everything

When you drive your car, truck or SUV, you have your view of the road and traffic around you. You likely cannot see what all other drivers in the area are doing. You also may not necessarily know about all road and weather conditions. Therefore, because you cannot know everything, you do not have enough information to conclude why the accident happened.

You may miss out on an insurance settlement

According to the Insurance Information Institute, more than 83% of Missouri drivers have car insurance. Depending on the terms of your insurance policy and the policies of other involved drivers, you may be eligible for a financial settlement for your injuries and property damage. If you admit fault, though, you may end up with nothing.

You may face additional charges

If your driving leads to a catastrophic car accident, you may face criminal or other charges. Prosecutors may use your admission of fault to establish your guilt. Consequently, to protect yourself, it is usually advisable to limit what you say after an accident.

Ultimately, rather than hurrying to admit blame, you may want to seek legal counsel before making any accident-related statements to other drivers, insurance adjusters or others.

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